Thursday, May 31, 2012

Søren Kierkegaard's Dark Alley

I've noticed that many quotations from Søren Kierkegaard sound like lines from some of the finer hard-boiled, pulp fiction published in the 1950s.


I see it all perfectly; there are two possible situations - one can either do this or that. My honest opinion and my friendly advice is this: do it or do not do it - you will regret both.



Listen to the cry of a woman in labor at the hour of giving birth - look at the dying man's struggle at his last extremity, and then tell me whether something that begins and ends thus could be intended for enjoyment.

The gods were bored; therefore they created human beings.


There are, as is known, insects that die in the moment of fertilization. So it is with all joy: life's highest, most splendid moment of enjoyment is accompanied by death.












Wednesday, May 30, 2012

The Music For The Freak Out

Here are two fine tunes from the Golden Age of Hippie Exploitation Cinema.

The Glass Bottle performs this track from the film, The People Next Door. The film presents a tripped out tale of young hippies freaking out and their suburban parents who must deal with the freaking.



A soundtrack record was released and it is not as hard to find as you might expect. I found one a few years ago and I barely leave the house.

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The song used to highlight the moves of Meg Foster in the film Thumb Tripping has (as far as I know) never been released on LP or CD. The film like the preceding one remains unavailable on DVD. This film captures the youth of the late 60's at a little older age than The People Next Door. Two youths using their thumbs to meander across the USA...




The music was written by Bob Thompson. He is known (well, to me at least) as the fellow who composed music that would be the soundtrack to some one wandering about on a giant marshmallow while zonked to the gills on painkillers and vodka cocktails:



The lyrics to the tune were written by Jerry Fuller. I'm guessing this is the same Jerry Fuller who wrote the song, Traveling Man, that Ricky Nelson took to the top of the charts. A quick look at Fuller's bio tells me it must be the same fellow. It looks like he is a person who likes to keep busy.

Beyond the tunes, though, there is Bruce Dern:



And that should sober you up real quick!




Tuesday, May 29, 2012

In a World Without Hope...and Pants!




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There are moments when just looking at this photo cheers me up.